Dating a child of alcoholics

Growing up in a chaotic and unpredictable environment causes the adult child of an alcoholic to internalize messages of distrust, insecurity, and belief that they should suppress their emotional responses.

Children of alcoholics exhibit higher rates of antisocial personality traits than what would be expected in the general population.

It is not uncommon to question how your relationships compare to those of others.

Yet for people raised in homes with substance abuse, it is even more difficult to envision what a healthy relationship looks like.

For decades, efforts at understanding and treating alcoholism have focused primarily on alcoholics and the havoc this disease has brought to their lives.

Later, groups such as Al-Anon and Alateen examined the effects that alcoholism had on the relatives and friends of alcoholics.

Concurrently, they may feel “crazy” when they are unable to understand their partner’s behavior.

It can be difficult for ACAs to express their honest emotions, and they may resort to guessing or looking to others to figure out how they should feel or express themselves.

It is likely that you or someone you love will be in a relationship with someone who was raised in a home with substance abuse.

The term adult child of an alcoholic (ACo A) was derived in an attempt to describe the unique characteristics generally found among individuals who grew up with parents, where either one or both, struggled with alcohol abuse.

Recent evidence has suggested that children of alcoholics are at a significant risk for a variety of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral problems when compared to peers who were not raised by alcoholic parents.

They might assume the role of needing to take care of their "sick" parent - a role that can sometimes remain intact in later relationships.

Children of alcoholics endure chronic and extreme levels of tension and stress as the result of growing up in the home with a parent struggling with alcohol abuse.

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